Brick Temple Towns of Bankura – Part I : Bishnupur

Roof of Kesto Rai Temple, Bishnupur

Roof of Kesto Rai Temple, Bishnupur

Around 695 AD, one Khastriya King during his travel was forced to stay in a Brahmin’s house residing at a village named Lau due to the ill health of his expecting wife. This village was located near Kotulpur of today’s Bankura district of West Bengal. The King‘s wife delivered a child and died. The remorseful king surrendered his infant child to the Brahmin as his guardian and left the place. The child grew up to excel on every spheres of life and went to become the first Malla King – Adi Malla and established the Malla Kingdom. After 300 years the kingdom was shifted by one of his descendents. The new Kingdom’s name was Bishnupur. It is said that this descendant named Jagat Malla was inspired by divine intervention to build up a temple of Goddess Mrinmoyee at Bishnupur and shift the kingdom there.

King Bir Hambhir

Bishnupur shot into fame during the rule of Malla King – Bir Hambhir the 49th Malla King (1586-1621). He was friendly with Mughals and took their side in their battle with Afghans. However after his interaction with Vaishnav guru Srinivas Acharya, Bir Hambir become his disciple. This incident resulted in a revolutionary change in Bishnupur and the Malla Kingdom became a hub of Baishnab culture. After a tour of Vrindavan with his guru, the King built started building up Baishnab structures and temples which was followed by his descendants which evidently turned Bishnupur into the most talked about temple town of Bengal.

West Bengal Tourist Lodge, Bishnupur

West Bengal Tourist Lodge, Bishnupur

Boarding the Howrah Purulia Express we reached Bishnupur around eight o’clock in the night. A cycle rickshaw journey of 20 minutes took us to our night’s stay at the West Bengal Tourist Lodge. Settling up for the night in our comfortable stay, we rose early next morning to start our tour of Bishnupur. After a refreshing bath followed by a sumptuous breakfast at 07:30 in the morning, we walked to reach our first stop – The Rasmancha. It is here you have to purchase tickets for entering Rasmancha, Jor Banglo (Kesto Rai) Temple and Shyam Rai Temple. Most of the prominent temples in Bishnupur are undertaken by the ASI (Archeological Survey of India).

Ras Mancha , Bishnupur

Ras Mancha , Bishnupur

Name engraved on walls by Cattle Class Tourists

Name engraved on walls by Cattle Class Tourists

The Rasmancha

Established in 1600 AD by the King Hambhir, the Rasmancha was used to display all the local idols in public during the Ras Festival. The Rasmancha stands on a raised laterite plinth with a Pyramidal Superstructure. It is thrilling to walk though its circumbulatory galleries having several arches through which the sun creates a mysterious light and shade effect. It is a unique and unparallel piece of architecture. However, it is painful to see ignorant and cattle class tourists having engraved the interior bricks with their names in crudest possible way.

One of the circumbulatory galleries of Rasmancha

One of the circumbulatory galleries of Rasmancha

Small Gate to the fort

Small Gate to the fort

Murcha Hill

Murcha Hill

Two Gateways and Stone Chariot

From the Rasmancha we took a brisk walk. Passing through narrow lanes of Bishnupur we finally came to an open space and encountered a stone gate on the middle of the road. This is known the Small Gateway to the fort. There is a small mound nearby besides a water body locally known as Murcha Hill (!) where canon is fired during Durgapuja. To the North West of this entrance there is small stone Chariot made of laterite stone. Like the Rasmancha this 17th century build structure is one of its kinds.

Stone Chariot

Stone Chariot

Large Gate of the fort

Large Gate of the fort

The next structure was an immense gate which was once entrance to the Bishnupur Royal Kingdom. Not only it is an entrance but it has a huge terrace which was perhaps to keep track of enemy soldiers. We were told that there is a secret chamber in its top floor from where soldiers could perform surprise attack on the enemy.

Two Ek Ratna Temple

As we entered through this gate we saw one Ek Ratna (One Pinnacled) temple on the far left side surrounded by a big boundary. This is the Laljiu temple built in 1658 by Malla King Bir Singha. Surmounted by a single Shikhara, this temple has ornamental stucco decoration on low relief carvings on its front wall.

Laljiu Temple, Bishnupur

Unique Gateway to Radheshyam Temple

Unique Gateway to Radheshyam Temple

Retracing back we encountered another interesting temple surrounded by a boundary again falling on our left. Perhaps with the most interesting temple gateway at Bishnupur, this is the Ek ratna Radheshyama Temple. Built in 1758 by the Malla king Chaitanya Singh, the triple arched gateway has two domes like structure with open windows on it. Most probably Shehnai used to be played here in old days.

Radheshyam Temple With Tulsi Mancha

Radheshyam Temple With Tulsi Mancha

The temple has an unique shaped Ratna (Pinnacle) on its top. There is a small Tulsimancha inside. Among the various artworks on its wall do not miss Vishnu in Anantashayan posture. It may be worth mentioning that all of the idols of deities belonging to several dilapidated temples are kept here and are worshiped together.

Bishnu In Anantashayan Posture, Radheshyam Temple

Bishnu In Anantashayan Posture, Radheshyam Temple

Beyond Radheshyam temple there is a small mound. On its other side there is a water body popularly known as Shyam Bandh. Bandh implies water tanks in Bengali. The Malla Kings had made seven Bandhs to relive people of water scarcity during the summer.

Mrinmoyee Temple & Bishnupur Fort

Mrinmoyee Temple - The first temple of Bishnupur

Mrinmoyee Temple – The first temple of Bishnupur

Just opposite to Radheshyam temple is the small and fresh painted single floor Mrinmoyee Temple. This is the oldest temple of Bishnupur. Regular worship is done here, especially during Durga Puja. Beyond the temple there is a pond. On its banks lie the ruins of Bishnupur Royal Palace/Fort. You can see the dome shaped towers from a distance. We took a tour inside the ruins but it is not advisable to venture inside. The route is full of undergrowths and a probable nesting place of snakes.

Ruins of Bishnupur Fort

Ruins of Bishnupur Fort

Kesto Rai alias Jor Bangla Temple, Bishnupur

Kesto Rai alias Jor Bangla Temple, Bishnupur

The Jor Bangla alias Kesto Rai Temple

Retracing back from the fort and crossing the Radheshyam temple, we went to see one of the star attractions of Bishnupur – The Jor Bangla alias Kesto Rai Temple. Built in 1655 by Malla King Raghunath Singh, this temple is known as Jor Bangla because it has two Ek-bangla or Do Chala structures (Roof with Double sided curved thatch) conjoined together, one acting as a porch, and the other as a shrine. ‘Ek’ indicates one and ‘Jor’ signifies double in Bengali. We had to show our tickets here to get entry.

Terracotta decorations on walls of Kesto Rai

Terracotta decorations on walls of Kesto Rai

Frankly speaking thirty minutes or one hour is actually a very short time for devoting time to this temple. To see all the sculptures on its wall in details, the minimum time should be at least one day. Still try not missing architecture which shows events with multiple scenes from Ramayana and Mahabharata. Examples are of King Dasarath killing Sindhumuni’s Son, Marriage of Ram, Saga of Laxman & Surpanakha, Krishna’s childhood activities. Single scene events include renunciation of arms by Bhisma, Bhishma lying on a bed of arrows (Sharashajja), Parvati feeding Ganesh & Kartika and Portugese Warships.

Following are interesting panels from the walls of Kesto Rai temple, which I have included in my blog.

 Arjuna using arrow of Rain God ( Parjanyastra) to generate water from earth for a thirsty Bhisma in bed of arrows (Sharashajja)

Arjuna using arrow of Rain God ( Parjanyastra) to generate water from earth for a thirsty Bhisma in bed of arrows (Sharashajja)

Portuguese warship carrying soldiers with firearms

Portuguese warship carrying soldiers with firearms

Hanuman Killing Multi headed Ahiraban ( Central Panel)

Hanuman Killing Multi headed Ahiraban ( Central Panel)

King Dasarath with dead body of Andha Muni's ( Blnd Sage) Son

King Dasarath with dead body of Andha Muni’s ( Blnd Sage) Son

Ram attacking a flying Taraka Rakkhashi (Demoness)

Ram attacking a flying Taraka Rakkhashi (Demoness)

Renunciationof arms by Bhisma as Arjuna with Shikhandi shoots at him

Renunciation of arms by Bhisma as Arjuna with Shikhandi shoots at him

Some dilapidated structures

The dilapidated Mahaprabhu Temple

The dilapidated Mahaprabhu Temple

From Jor Banglo it is a 15 minutes’ walk on in to the Pancha Ratna (Five Pinnacled) Shyam Rai Temple passing by two deul shaped deserted temples (Jugol Kishor Krishna Balaram Temple) on your right and a severally dilapidated temple on your left. The later known as Mahaprabhu Temple is identical to the Kesto Rai temple, but unfortunately now totally in ruins. Walking further down on the road we turned right to go into a rather picturesque lane. Just at the entrance of this lane on the opposite side there is a sinister looking square shaped deserted structure, locally known as Gumghar(Torture chamber).

Jugol Kishor Krishna Balaram Deul Temples

Jugol Kishor Krishna Balaram Deul Temples

Gumghar (Torture Chamber) with a Tourist Road directions board in the front

Gumghar (Torture Chamber) with a Tourist Road directions board in the front

The lane opposite to Gumghar was lined with trees on the left over a stretch of elevated mound. This lane took us to the Shyam Rai Temple. On the other side of this mound there is a canal besides a parallel lane. Maybe once upon a time this was a part of trench or moat around this temple. At Shyam Rai Temple, we also we had to show the ticket.

Five Pinnacled (Panch Chura) Shyam Rai Temple

Shyam Rai ( Paanch Chura) Temple

Shyam Rai ( Paanch Chura) Temple

Multiple Raschakras on wall of Shyam Rai Temple

Multiple Raschakras on wall of Shyam Rai Temple

Built in 1643 by King Raghunath Singh, this temple has triple arched gateway on its four sides and has innumerable terracotta artwork on both exterior and interior walls. Even the four of five towers have extensive decorations on it. The fifth one was reconstructed by ASI after it was severely damaged in the past. Look out for the huge Raschakra, numerous scenes of Krishnalila, Indra fighting sitting on elephant, various hunting scenes, Battle between Ram & Ravan. Like Kesto Rai, you need at least one day to vividly explore the sculptures of this temple.

Following are interesting panels from the walls of Shyam Rai temple to give a fair idea about the class of Terracotta art in its wall.

Giant Raschakra on walls of Shyam Rai Temple

Giant Raschakra on walls of Shyam Rai Temple

Battle of Ram & Ravana

Battle of Ram & Ravana

Multiple Scenarios of Krishna Lila, Shyam Rai Temple

Multiple Scenarios of Krishna Lila, Shyam Rai Temple

Terracotta Studded Pillars and Facade of Shyam Rai Temple

Terracotta Studded Pillars and Facade of Shyam Rai Temple

Terracotta Studded central pinnacle of Shyam Rai Temple

Terracotta Studded central pinnacle of Shyam Rai Temple

Both of these temples are superior work of art, unique in their own style. I wonder why they are still not declared as World Heritage by UNESCO.

It was 11:00 now. Departing from the Shyam Rai temple, we chose our next stop as the huge Madanmohan temple. This was in the other part of city and we hired cycle rickshaws to reach our destination.

Madan Mohan, Madan Gopal & Sridhar Temple

Madan Mohan Temple with triple arched dochala gateway

Madan Mohan Temple with triple arched dochala gateway

Terracotta Panels on Madan Mohan Temple

Terracotta Panels on Madan Mohan Temple

Built in 1694 by the Malla King Durjan Singh, this Eka-ratna with smooth rekha tower temple is surrounded by a boundary wall with a Do Chala triple entry gate.  The temple itself has triple entrance and Lord Madan Mohan (an incarnation of Bishnu) is regularly worshiped here. That allows you to get over the base of the temple and see the architecture close at hand. Among the excellent terracotta works on its wall, watch out for Nabanarikunja (nine Gopinis forming an elephant), Incarnation of Krishna as the King, Slaying of five sons of Pandava princes in the battle, Sita in Ashok Ban, Ram Ravan Battle, birth of Krishna, Mace fight between Bheema and Durjodahan. Also there is a Chandimandap inside the complex opposite to the temple.

Chandimandap, Madan Mohan Temple

Chandimandap, Madan Mohan Temple

Following are few interesting panels from the walls of Madan Mohan temple.

NabaNariKunja - Nine Gopinis forming an elephant - Madan Mohan Temple

NabaNariKunja – Nine Gopinis forming an elephant – Madan Mohan Temple

Incarnation of Krishna as the king

Incarnation of Krishna as the king

Five Pandava Sons assassinated by Kauravas in Kurukhetra war

Five Pandava Sons assassinated by Kauravas in Kurukhetra war

Krishna leaving for Dwarka on the Chariot of Akrur

Krishna leaving for Mathura on the Chariot of Akrur

We bought one small guidebook from an old aged vendor in front of the temple. The book was small but extremely informative. It is a good ready reckoner for all the temples of Bishnupur.

Madan Gopal temple- The second five pinnacled structure at Bishnupur

Madan Gopal temple- The second five pinnacled structure at Bishnupur

From Madanmohan we travelled to the 2nd Panch Ratna temple – The Madana Gopal, which was yet on another side of the city. This South facing temple is situated inside a market area located between Jamuna Bandh and Kalindi Bandh. Instead of a King this temple was made by Queen Shiromani alias Churamani Devi (wife of Malla King Krishna Singh) in 1665. This South facing temple has an octagonal centre pinnacle whilst its other pinnacles are four cornered. Built with laterite stone, this 37 feet temple with triple arched gateway has very little terracotta sculpture left.

Sridhar Temple of Bose Family

Sridhar Temple of Bose Family

Incarnation of Ram as King of Ayodha

Incarnation of Ram as King of Ayodha

There is only one Naba Ratna temple (Nine Pinnacled) Temple at Bishnupur. Located in Bose Para near to the Madan Gopal temple, this triple arched gateway structure is known as the Sridhara temple of the local Bose Family. This east facing temple has no connection with the Malla Kings and is assumed to be constructed during the beginning of 19th century. This is the most ‘youngest’ brick temple of Bishnupur, thus its terracotta sculpture styles is bit different. Look out for the huge terracotta Krishnalila on the central Panel of the temple and Rama Sita on throne on the left hand panel.

Krishnalila Panel, Sridhar Temple

Krishnalila Panel, Sridhar Temple

One of the Dasabatar playing cards

One of the Dasabatar playing cards

On our way back we stopped at an artisans den to buy the local Dasavatar playing card. Unlike ordinary cards they are made of a round piece of cloth with tamarind seed butter to make it stiff. Natural colours are used to depict the Dash Avatars (Ten Avatars of Lord Bishnu).

It was exactly 12:30 p.m. when we reached our lodge. We had a lovely lunch at the in house restaurant of the lodge, followed by a short siesta.

A visit to the Local Museum

Aacharya Yogesh Chandra Purakirti Bhawan - Local Musuem

Aacharya Yogesh Chandra Purakirti Bhawan – Local Musuem

Around 14:00 we visited the local museum- Aacharya Yogesh Chandra Purakirti Bhawan. The Museum is a must see for archeology and history lovers. Nearby is Lalbandh, one of seven bandhs (tanks) build up by Malla Kings. Made Famous by local folktales and the novel of Ramapada Chowdhury, the popular belief is that it was named after the beautiful Lalbai, the paramour of king Raghunath Singh (2nd). However historical evidence says it was constructed during the rule of Bir Singh and was named after Laljiu. Near to Lalbandh is a modern temple of Devi Sarbamangala.

Dalmadal Canon and Devi Chinnamasta Temple

Devi Chinnamasta Idol

Devi Chinnamasta Idol

From the museum, we went for another round of temple hopping. We took the road just adjacent to the tourist lodge. Our first destination was not a temple but a huge Canon named as the “Dalmadal”. There is a story prevailing that when Bhaskar Pandit and his Maratha Bargis tried to attack Bishnupur in 1742, Lord Madan Mohan himself had fired this canon to drive them out! This huge canon is around 12.5 feet and was made with 63 iron rings. Nearby is the temple of the headless Goddess – Chinnamasta (A form of Kali). The Idol is of a rare kind, although the temple has been renovated in modern style.

Dalmadal Canon - Lord Madan Mohan is believed to have fired this

Dalmadal Canon – Lord Madan Mohan is believed to have fired this

The Seven Laterite Ek Ratna Temples

Opposite to this temple, there is a road which leads to a cluster of seven laterite stone built ek-ratna (one pinnacled) temples. Once upon a time these were all covered with stucco as laterite usually gives a coarse appearance. However with passing of time, maximum of the stucco work has wearied off.

Nandalal Temple

Nandalal Temple

The first on the left is Nandalal temple with ridged tower and almost no decoration on it. Just opposite to it are three temples in a separate complex. Built by Malla King Krishna Singh in 1726, the temples are collectively known as Jor Mandir. The temple on the south has several scenarios from Mahabharat and Krishna Lila on its walls.

Jora Mandir group of Temples

Jora Mandir group of Temples

Walking further down the road we came to yet another laterite structure – Radhagovinda Temple. The temple is visible from the road, but you have to walk for sometimes and take a right turn to enter it. Constructed by Krishna Singh in 1729, this temple is adjacent to the three Jor Mandirs. Inside the complex there is small terracotta chariot. You can view all the four temples together by climbing on to a nearby mound

Radhagovinda Temple

Radhagovinda Temple

On the same road after 5 minutes we came to the 1737 built Radhamadhab temple having a unique Do Chala Mandap structure with ten columns on its western side. This structure is similar to the gate of Madan Mohan temple. Only difference is that since the earlier structure is fixed with the wall and hence has only eight columns.

Radhamadhab Temple with Do Chala Mandap

Radhamadhab Temple with Do Chala Mandap

Like the Madan Gopal temple, Radhamadhab temple was also built by Churamoni devi. Apart from scenes from Krishnaliala, Dasavatar and others on the outer triple columns and on the walls there are several scenes featuring animals. These were also once upon a time totally covered with Stucco.

Further down in the same complex near the archeological office we came across the last and the oldest of the laterite structures – the Kalachand temple. Like the previous temple, this shrine is surmounted by a Shikara on a sloping roof. Built in 1656 by Maharaja Raghunath Singh, the temple shows mainly various scenes from Krishnalila.

Kalachand Temple

Kalachand Temple

Retracing back to the road, we discovered an alternative route on our right which is a typical country road. Walking on it by passing the Ramananda College we came to the main road which is known as the Bishnupur College Road. Turning left, we reached the tourist lodge after a brisk walk at around 17:30 in the afternoon. In the weekend the Rasmancha, Shyam Rai and Kesto Rai are illuminated with light. However we were too tired for a return trip and called it off for the day to retire to our rooms.

One of the manufacturing unit of Baluchari Sarees at Bishnupur

One of the manufacturing unit of Baluchari Sarees at Bishnupur

Bishnupur is famous for its Baluchuri Sarees and its terracotta souvenirs specially the horses of Bankura. Bishnupur is also the origin of Bishnupur Gharana of Singing – A Dhrupad tradition of Hindustani music.

A ride to the local Artisan’s village

The scenic road to Panchmura Artisan's village

The scenic road to Panchmura Artisan’s village

Terracotta Magic creation in progress

Terracotta Magic creation in progress

The next day we took a trip to the village of Panchmura which is an artisan’s village in a hired car through the famous red soiled road of Bankura. We got a live demonstration of Terracotta artifacts being made which was in itself very thrilling. Almost every hut has several artifacts on display in front of their house. We bought several souvenir items which came at a much cheaper rate compared to the city shops.

Finished Terracotta Horses of Bankura for sale at Panchmura

Finished Terracotta Horses of Bankura for sale at Panchmura

We returned to the town around lunch time. Having spent a nice weekend we left for Kolkata in Rupashi Bangla express at 17:23 with a promise in mind to come back soon. There were so many temples and places yet to visit in and around Bishnupur.

Going

Bishnupur is well connected with Kolkata by train and bus. Trains like Purulia Express, Rupashi Bangla Express and Aranyak Express offers regular service. The Journey takes 3:30 to 04:00 hours by train.

Staying

Although there are several hotels at Bishnupur, the best place for lodging is the West Bengal Tourism lodge. The in House restaurant is good for simple Bengali foods and snacks.

Timing of Temples and Tickets

Ticket booking for three temples starts from 07:30. The Temples are officially open upto 17:30 in the afternoon. Ticket cost is Rs 5 for all the three temples. Still Camera shooting attracts no fees, but video shooting will cost Rs 25 per camera. Like all ASI monuments tripod is not allowed inside any of the temple complex.

Bishnupur Map

Bishnupur Map

Reference

1. Bankura Jelar Purakirti (Bengali) by Amiya Kumar Bandopadhyay
2. Banglar Mandir Sthyapatto O Bhaskorjjo (Bengali) by Pranab Roy
3. Temple Art Of Late Medieval Bengal By Nihar Ghosh
4. Guide book on Bishnupur by Gunamoy Chakaraborty

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24 thoughts on “Brick Temple Towns of Bankura – Part I : Bishnupur

  1. Somen Sengupta says:

    Great Little Budha…. Whenever your camera and pen smile it ensure a delightful reading…Didi not find much new information but style of writing and snaps are really admirable.Just add one thing the father of Adi Malla was on his way to Puri when his wife died of child birth at Gokulnagar.

    Infact Gokulnagar was original capital of Malla – Later it was shifted to Bishnupur to avoid plunder of muslim invaderds.

    • AMITABHA GUPTA says:

      Thanks Somen. Actually the village Lau was somewhere between Kotulpur and Gokulnagar. It is where Mother of Adi Malla died. I had no idea that the family was on their way to Puri that time. Thanks for the information.

      The capital was shifted to Bishnupur for several reasons. One of the main reason was Divine intervention experienced by Jagat Malla to built a temple of Goddess Mrinmoyee at Bishnupur as mentioned in my post.

  2. oranjautumn says:

    Quite a thorough presentation. Feels like visiting Bishnupur and other temple towns around.

    ‘My personal favourites here are : ‘Naba Naree Kunjar’ and the map.

  3. Amitabh Shukla says:

    Sir, You are doing a great job , dont let it go away like this, Post these details in Nat Geographic . Discovery and indian news channels, You have a great potential. Take it to the next level.

    • AMITABHA GUPTA says:

      Thanks for these inspirational words. I contribute regularly as a Travel writer and Photographer to several prominent National magazines and Newspapers.

      I write blog because actually it is the next level of Travel writing after getting highlighted in print media. You have no word limit and the viewers are unlimited.

  4. Achintya Mahanta says:

    your collection is great .I invite you at Bankura Town where 300 years old Baisnab Samadhisthal is being destroyed by Bankura Municipality. Please take hundreds of photographs and post.Take adequate steps to help us.Thanking you Achintya Mahanta,08926059919

  5. Mala says:

    Wow,what can i say!Sitting in a cold corner of Canada my heart is filled with warmth,thank you kind sir!Beautiful,breathtaking and full of knowledge.Humble salutations.your blog is book marked for life!

    • AMITABHA GUPTA says:

      I feel encouraged to write more blog posts thanks to readers like you.

      I would request you to read one by one the whole series of Brick Temple town blogposts ( It has five parts) .

      I have written a similar series on Terracotta Temples around Shantiniketan in recent times. Please check that series too.

  6. Pradip Zaveri says:

    Very informative with beautiful images.
    will it be possible to share, in high resolution, images pertaining to Krishna.
    i am preparing a catalouge on krishna in mural paintings and would like to reproduce some of your images.

  7. Ravindra Apte says:

    I have heard and read about Bishnupur, but got to see the spender of the place in your blog. I am planning a visit to the temple town by end Nov. Your blog will prepare me for the visit. My interest in temple architecture is of recent times. In Sept I visited Tamil Nadu to see the temples. As a hobby I make documentaries. Here is a link to the documentary

    Temples of Tamil Nadu https://youtu.be/-h_MmIH-XeU
    (May be you have to copy the link and pest it the address line to open the video)

    • AMITABHA GUPTA says:

      Loved the documentary…. I must visit these temples some day…. you have done a good job with the video along with the commentary… The Shiva’s arrival sculpture reminded me of a similar scenario in terracotta depicting Shiva’s marriage…at Sonamukhi’s temple ( I have written about Sonamukhi in the series of Bankura Temples depicting Bishnupur)

  8. Pitkar Y D says:

    good morning sir, i am impressed with your documentation and information. simply superb.is there a formal book having all of it by you on Bishnupur …? would like to meet you some time. please respond to me on my email ….pitkaryd@rediffmail.com thanks. Prof Pitkar. Architect and photographer.

  9. Somesh says:

    I take pride whenever i say I’m from bishnupur bankura . Its a shame that our government has been neglecting this beautiful piece of land and focusing only on the urban areas in the country. Whereas European countries are very successful in conserving their architectural heritage !

  10. Surajit Pan says:

    You r doing excellent work. You make a new terracotta design on whole Bishnupur . It is photo finish dictionary of Bishnupur. Continue this type work on other sites. Many many people get help from your work. Wish happy – successful smooth life.Thanking you.

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